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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
of programs and people you'll meet tonight. people like diane ladaker. she's the keeper of the bricks. ten years ago, she turned her home into a safe haven for kids. she called it kids off the block. we'll tell you about her remarkable story, but dien said she still doesn't have the happy ending these kids need because too often there is that next brick. there was tyrone lawson shot dead after a high school basketball game. instead of looking forward to the prom, his mother said i'm looking for an insurance policy to bury him. or hadiya pendleton who performed at president obama's inauguration festivities, became a gang fatality. she was not party to that fight or that culture. she was part of an epidemic. anderson and "360" have been reporting on it year after year, and people say enough is enough. >> this was the hardest thing to see another baby lying in a casket. >> get in here and change the city. make it safe for us to walk down the street every day. >> we lost seven children this year. enough is enough. >> i really, really hope somebody can stop this. >> you can expect this to happe
over ten years in additional spending cuts. diane swonk is chief economist at mesereau financial. alice rev lin was a member of the president's debt commission and is a senior fellow at the brookings institution. michael tanner is a senior fellow at the cato institute. thanks for being here. michael, you say we should not fear door number one. that is the forced budget cuts, what some people know as the skweser, as it stands, which goes into place on friday if we don't do anything. why? >> well, let's remember that first of all these are cults only in the washington sense that any reduction from future planned increases in spending is a cut. the reality is even if the sequester goes into effect, the federal government will spend more every year. by 2022 it will spend $2 trillion more than it is spending today. we're talking about cuts that are 2.4% of total federal spending. if the federal government can't cut three cents out of every dollar without throwing us into the dark ages, then clearly we're doing something wrong. >> all right, alice rivlin. simpson/bowles, i mentioned that, the
the story from mountain view. hello, bob. >> reporter: good evening, diane and terry. the group of scientists and former astronauts working out of this office building in mountain view don't want us to be blindsided by a big meteor like we were yesterday when a ten-ton rock from outer space entered the earth's atmosphere over siberia and blowing out windows and hurting more than 1,000 people, that's why the b-612 foundation on the peninsula is trying to give us an extra pair of eyes to the skies. they have been raising money to send into the orbit around the sun a space te le scop to spot the asteroids that we can't see here on earth. nasa has reportedly found most of the ones that could destroy our planet but as far as the ones that are smaller and destroy cities and wipe out regions, as far as those are concerned 99% are a mystery to us, we only now about 1% of them. the foundation believes it's so-called sentinel telescope can discover more asteroids in its first month of service in 2018 than all of our earth-based telescopes have been able to do over the past 30 years. scien
.2 trillion over ten years, in additional spending cuts. diane swonk is the chief economist at. michael tanner is a senior fellow at the cato institute. welcome to all of you. michael, let me start with you, you say we should not fear doorm number one. the budget cuts, the sequester, why? >> well let's remember first of all, these are cuts only in the washington sense that any reduction from future planned increases in spending is a cut. the reality is, even if the sequester goes into effect, the federal government will spend more every year by 2022, it will spend $2 trillion more than it is spending today. we're talking about cuts that are 2.4% of total federal spending. if the federal government can't cut three cents out of every dollar without throwing us into the dark ages, then clearly we're doing something wrong. >> all right. alice riflen, simpson-bowles, i mentioned they're at it again. listen to this. >> to get this done we're going to have to, this was clear at the end of last year, we're going to have to push both sides out of their comfort zone. the republicans are going to have to
and fannie mae. a new report says that's what we need to help the economy bounce back. diane mass can heed doe has more. >> issuing a number of recommendations to changes of federal housing policies including the end to government backed lending as we know it. the report calls the housing america's future new direction for national policy aims to rebuild the private mortgage market and give home buyers and renters with a number of new policies and set of guidelines how to implement them. fannie mae and freddie mac replace them with a public garn tore which would guarantee mortgage payments without buying issue mortgage backed security. while it was necessary for the government to step in when the market collapsed five years ago the current role in housing is unsustainable at the moment. fanny, freddie report 90 percent of sij family mortgages and faa faces billions of dollars in losses. they also express the concern that credit worthy people are being denied housing due to overly strict underwriting standards. if they step back private lenders will step in. these recommendations are go on
been set. >> robin joins us along with diane mccarthy. diane, you were in court today. take us inside. what was it like in there? >> the first thing i can tell you is it was very, very hot. it was very tense and it was very hot. we were all clustered together in this quite small courtroom. together with this emotion that was just sort of reverberating off the walls, everybody was sweating, tense, whispering, quiet. >> robin, that's quite a lo kashs judge, he spoke for two hours. is that par for the course for a bail hearing in south africa? >> you know, this whole bail hearing has taken on the facade of the trial within the trial. we have been gripped by all the forensic details and also by the theater of it. and i tweeted today is this bitter or is it thorough? one expert said this is a fair judgment. he had to balance everything, every minute detail of the bail hearing. i think it's a bit of both. i think the judge knew he had literally the world sort of waiting for his every word. we were all gripped. it was very dramatic. >> diane, over the last few days in court, people watched o
with a promising life in front of them. no trial date has been set. >> robyn joins us along with diane mccarthy. diane, you were in court today. take us inside. what was it like in there? >> the first thing i can tell you is it was very, very hot. it was very tense and it was very hot. we were all clustered together in this quite small courtroom. together with this emotion that was just sort of reverberating off the walls, everybody was sweating, tense, whispering, quiet. >> robyn, that's quite a loquatious judge, he spoke for two hours. is that par for the course for a bail hearing in south africa? >> you know, this whole bail hearing has taken on the facade of the trial within the trial. we have been gripped by all the forensic details and also by the theater of it. and i tweeted today is this bitter or is it thorough? one expert said this is a fair judgment. he had to balance everything, every minute detail of the bail hearing. i think it's a bit of both. i think the judge knew he had literally the world sort of waiting for his every word. we were all gripped. it was very dramatic. >>
more than you will help us. diane used the appropriate phrase. when your personal story overwhelms the message of the attempt to sell our product, you are no longer of value to us. connell: if you have a really huge athlete or whoever it is, and they are represented by a company like nike and they do something that tarnishes the brand, there is no way for the company to go back and say we are out of this contract and we are going to sue you for hurting us. >> this is almost inconceivable. the spokesperson did something to harm himself to harm the brand. there is no negligence brand course of action. dagen: there were rumors that lance armstrong was dope since his first tour de france. he could turn around and sue them. >> yes and no. it would depend on mr. armstrong's contract with nike. there is some language in there to protect the spokesperson. there is a lot of opportunities for the seller to jump through a loophole, if you will, to get rid of the spokesperson if they do not like that person anymore. they can always keep paying. it would be almost inconceivable that somebody wh
with her father to discuss the story. you can watch it on world news with diane sawyer right after abc 7 news at 5:00. >> families hoping to end a boy scout ban of gay scouts and leaders have%,,vz 1.4 millin signatures supporting them and delivered with those sig turtz boy scouts of america's head quarters in texas today. officials are meeting to discuss this ban. last week they discussed a qq is a lot of excitement in the bay area though 49ers came up short in super bowl 47 last night. take a look at this scene. sky 7 was overhead. 49ers landed to cheering stan fans. niners came up five yards short after one of the greatest come backs. we saw collin kaepernick give fans the number one sign. abc 7 news is live where a bigger group of fans have gathered. leanne? >> i know. it's about, i think, i calculated about 150, maybe 200 people are here, fans and so forth. you know, one thing have youwçp so-to-say is that they have a great sense of humor. this is sfit the fact we lost. have you a picture here, what is this... what does this say? >> this is my game face. i just want to let them know
impact? and is this market in denial as it continues to hang strong? good morning to you, diane. >> good morning. >> we're within striking distance here of all-time highs potentially on the cost of a gallon of gas. how do you explain that to people at this time of year? because this is very early to have thirt o rally. >> it is very early to have the rally. and it's a multitude of factors, in addition to, we've seen crude prices go up on brent, which is part of the problem, because that's in the mix, about 68% of the price at the pump is the actual cost of oil. wti and cushing hasn't gone up as much. it gets stuck down in cushing, oklahoma, so we don't get it all in the places we need. frankly, it doesn't really matter, at the end of the day, we're now talking about a rise in the price of gasoline 25 cents in the first two weeks of february alone. a rise in the price of gasoline that is equivalent to the payroll tax holiday expiring for some households, depending how much they fill up their tank a month. it could be up to $20 a week extra they're paying at this stage of the game. as you
and on the new york subway. diane von furstenberg was seen wearing them. tweet using the #ifihadglass. the response has been overwhelming. despite the interest, google will still have to work out the kinks. >> some of the challenges for google glass will certainly be price. another challenge will be ease of use. another challenge will be privacy. how comfortable will people feel using these devices and recording and sharing moments in real time? >> now if all goes as planned, google plans to release glass before the end of the year. the prototypes cost $1,500 each. the google says that the consumer version will probably be a little bit less. >> they want us to be walking around heads up as opposed to be looking down at our smart phones. can i get e-mails on this thing, texts on this thing? >> it's designed to shoot photo, videos. you can send texts to someone if you're live streaming but as of right now you can't read e-mails or text on it. >>> re-creating the magic moment on our plaza live. she'll try it, right after this. [ jen garner ] what skincare brand is so effective... so trus
these things? >> possibly. well, actually, they are. so diane vaughn thirstenberg for her show in new york fashion week this year created a film of about four minutes shot entirely with google glasses. so here you see her in the film that is entirely from her perspective, and what the google glasses are, it's is not just an extension of your phone, it's an extension of yourself. so they've got a camera built in. there's actually -- when you wear the glasses, you see images and video overlaid into what's in front of you. >> what a weird perspective of the world. it almost seems creepy. >> it's creepy, it's extremely advanced and futuristic, and the biggest question about many of google's products is the world ready for a device like this? or do we need to go you know, tip toe into the category with something like an apple i- watch? >> i don't think i want to go into that category. but we'll see and i know you'll continue to follow these things for us. >> absolutely. >> we appreciate it from cnet.com. >>> and coming up next hockey players mixing it up i
, designer diane von furstenburg wore a pair throughout fashion week. >> amazing world. >> reporter: now google is looking for thousands of end-stage testers, asking hopefuls to tweet using th the #ifihadglass. the response has been overwhelming. despite the interest, experts say google will still have to work out the kinks. >> some of the challenges will be price. another challenge will be ease of use. another challenge will be privacy. how comfortable will people feel using these devices and recording and sharing moments in real time. >> see you, dude. >> and that was mara schiavocampo reporting. >>> turning to business news, fresh evidence that the housing recovery is accelerating. a check in with cnbc's bertha coombs with more on that and rest of the day's business headlines. bertha? >> good morning, barbara. we have stocks mixed, the dow higher this morning on strong housing data and strong earnings from home depot. alleges a big rebound in consumer confidence this month as american have shrugged off washington's fiscal gridlock. but ben bernanke is warning congress those automatic
. >> stephanie: diane in lansing, michigan, you're on "the stephanie miller show." hi diane. >> caller: hi, stephanie. i'm so glad i stumbled upon your show. i have an issue with the gentleman who called about the gun buyback program. he said that taxes pay for that. well, in my state they have people donate to that. they don't pay taxes for that. >> stephanie: okay. interesting. >> caller: i don't know what -- >> some jurisdictions it is taxpayer funded. some, it's not. >> caller: okay. i just wanted to make that clear. >> stephanie: thank you for that. appreciate it. >> here in los angeles, if you sell back your gun you get a $100 gift card to ralph's. >> stephanie: and a 99 cent store spatula. >> off-brand comet. >> stephanie: jerry in sacramento. >> caller: hello stephanie. i just wanted to sound a little paul revere warning here. i know we're giggly about how the republicans are killing themselves nationally but locally, they're winning the battle. we're fighting to keep our schools open here in sacramento. they're closing 15 -- i'm sorry. they're closing 11 elementary schools, displa
. diane: it is the international monetary fund realizing it will cut the growth forecast for the united states and the global economy. the automatic spending cuts take effect in the u.s. tomorrow. the imf says the biggest trading partners with the u.s. are going to be the most affected by the impact of the so-called sequester. the automatic spending cuts would trigger u.s. credit downgrade but failure to raise the statutory debt limit almost certainly will. a new report from the federal reserve bank of new york show young americans having a tougher time repaving college loans. 35% of people under 30 were 90 days late on their student loan payments at the end of last year. that is up from 26% in 2008. that is the latest from the fox business network giving you the power to prosper. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choo any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay t
something else. and diane told a story of her grandmother after the bannick war of 1878. as a preteen she was marched all the way to boise and then another 300 miles to a reservation in yacama, from which she escaped with another young woman, together they swam the columbia river, and traveled over 300 miles back to berth. it was there they began to rebuild their tribe with no land and no resources. diane said when she looks out and sees other tribes that are better off than theirs, she is not envyous. she remembers her grandmother, and she thinks, look how far we have come. there is a lesson here for us and for our state. it was a really long, hard path in january 2011 to hear, and a long difficult road stretches out before us. so when we leave this place this morning, let's commit ourselves to partnership and to a shared vision so that when we reassemble two years from now in this chamber, we can once again say, look how far we've come. thank you very much. [applause] [applause] >> on the next "washington journal," we will preview the state of the union address. then we will focus on lo
was interrupted several times by protesters. at one point, senator diane feinstein stopped the proceedings and actually had the room cleared. >>> all right. too close for comfort. scientists at nasa say a giant asteroid, about half the size of a football field, is headed our way. they predict it will pass very close to earth on february 15th. no closer than about 17,100 miles. it's one of many large space objects barrelling toward us at the very moment. experts say all of them, inclauinclud including this one, will have very limited, low-impact probability. >> very good. >> fun to watch, probably won't hit. >> i bet a lot of people will weigh in on this next story. should you get paid for all the extra time you spend checking work e-mails when you are outside of work? a chicago police officer has filed a lawsuit against the city asking them to pay up for all the extra hours he says he's frequently required to work when he's off-duty. this is actually happening from home on his department-issued blackberry. that's what he wants to be reimbursed for. here's what the officer's attorney told o
. it says it's taking actions to confront senior chinese officials about hacking. diane finestein says she has raised this with chinese official herself and she says they're in denial. kate and wolf? >> and this firm, mandiant, even uncovered, down to the specific person, some of the people involved with this. >> he says back to its own tracking, it's learned the handles of some of these hackers that go by monikers of ugly gorilla. they acknowledge that now that the chinese are on to them and know that they're on to them, they'll be harder to track now. but they're going to keep at them. >> scary stuff. brian todd, thank you. >> thank you. >>> all right. this is just coming into "the situation room." cnn's elise labott has confirmed that the secretary of state, john kerry, is expected to meet with syrian opposition leaders next week in rome, as part of his first official overseas trip as america's top diplomat. kerry said last week that he has some ideas on how to change the current situation in syria. he plans to address those ideas with european and middle eastern leaders while on his tr
's not connected to sequester, and nor does it mean those teachers are losing their job. and we just spoke to diane young, and she also said what the secretary said is not on point. it's not really clear nor is it accurate. what she said is they're waiting on word from the federal authorities about head start money, which may or may not be part of this whole equation, and they haven't heard from the federal government, so they may, in fact, have to get rid of some teachers, simply because they're not hearing from the federal government about a routine matter, routine financing for their district, so they have to plan and that's the only thing they can do right now. we'll have to find out more from that district and others about when, how, and if these forced budget cuts are going to effect them. but the indication right now is from the department of education, that they don't really seem to know, or at least they haven't been able to point out a clear, clear example of what the secretary was claiming today. wolf? >> tom, thanks very much for that explanation. in these battles that are underway, ove
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)